Rancho Regional Veterinary Hospital offers pet vaccinations that can help you keep your pet happy and healthy. We offer both dog vaccinations and cat vaccinationson a customized schedule to ensure they get all of the shtots necessary for their age and their lifestyle. Let our California veterinary hospital help your pet get off to the best start in life by making an appointment for pet vaccinations with us today.

It is very important to keep your pets vaccinations up to date. Puppies and kittens can start receiving vaccinations as early as six weeks old, and should receive booster vaccinations every three weeks until they are over sixteen weeks of age. If vaccinations are not boostered properly, it can result in an inadequate immune response. This means that your puppy or kitten may not be fully protected against the viruses we are vaccinating against, so it is very important for their health to be on schedule.

Following is a standard vaccination protocol. We customize vaccinations to every puppy and kitten based on their age and lifestyle needs, the Doctor will determine which vaccinations are necessary.

Puppy Vaccine Protocol

1. First Visit (6-8 weeks)

DAPP #1
First Deworming
Fecal parasite exam

2. Second Visit (9-11 weeks)

DAPP #2
Second Deworming
Bordetella #1

3. Third Visit (12-15 weeks)

DAPP #3
Bordetella #2

4. Fourth Visit (16-19 Weeks)

DAPP FINAL
Rabies (one year)

 

DAPP Vaccine (Also known as Distemper, 5 in 1)

  • D: Distemper
  • A: Adenovirus
  • P: Parvovirus
  • P: Parainfluenza

Distemper:

Canine distemper is a contagious and serious viral illness with no known cure. It is a viral disease of domestic dogs and certain wildlife such as ferrets, skunks and raccoon’s.

The virus is spread through the air and by direct or indirect (i.e. bowls, bedding) contact. This incurable, often fatal, multisystem viral disease affects the respiratory and central nervous systems.

Symptoms:
Fever
Coughing
Vomiting
Anorexia
Diarrhea
Seizures

Adenovirus:

Infectious canine hepatitis is a viral disease of that is caused by the canine adenovirus CAV-1, a type of DNA virus that causes upper respiratory tract infections. This virus targets the parenchymal (functional) parts of the organs, notably the liver, kidneys, eyes and endothelial cells (the cells that line the interior surface of the blood vessels).

Symptoms:
Fever
Anorexia
Lethargy
Vomiting
Diarrhea

Parvo:

Canine parvovirus [CPV] infection is a relatively new disease that appeared for the first time in dogs in 1978. Because of the severity of the disease and its rapid spread through the canine population, CPV has aroused a great deal of public interest.

The main source of the virus is from the feces of infected dogs. The virus begins to be shed just before clinical signs develop and continues for about ten days. Susceptible dogs become infected by ingesting the virus. Subsequently, the virus is carried to the intestine where it invades the intestinal tract and causes inflammation. Unlike most other viruses, CPV is stable in the environment and is resistant to the effects of heat, detergent, alcohol, and many disinfectants. Due to its stability, the virus is easily transmitted via the hair or feet of infected dogs, contaminated shoes, clothes, and other objects or areas contaminated by infected feces. Direct contact by dogs is not required to spread the virus. Dogs that become infected with the virus and show clinical signs will usually become ill within six to ten days of the initial infection.

Symptoms:
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Lethargy
Anorexia
doctor nursing

Bordetella:

Tracheobronchitis, commonly named kennel cough is a contagious respiratory disease among dogs. Kennel cough is characterized by inflammation of the trachea and bronchi. Several viruses and bacteria can cause kennel cough, often at the same time. These include adenovirus type-2 [distinct from adenovirus type-1 that causes infectious hepatitis], parainfluenza virus, and the Bacterium Bordetella. Because the infection spreads when dogs are housed together, it is often seen soon after dogs have been in kennels, hence the term “kennel cough”.

Symptoms:
Dry hacking cough is the most common symptom
Cough may sound like honking
Retching
Watery nasal discharge
Unvaccinated puppies and young dogs, or immunocompromised dogs might experience the most severe symptoms of the disease
In severe cases, symptoms progress and can include pneumonia, inappetence, fever, lethargy and even death
In mild cases, dogs would likely be active and eating normally

Kitten Vaccine Protocol

1. First Visit (6-8 weeks)

FVRCP #1
First Deworming
Fecal parasite exam

2. Second Visit (9-11 weeks)

FVRCP #2
Second Deworming
FELV/FIV test
Leukemia #1

3. Third Visit (12-15 weeks)

FVRCP #3
Leukemia #2

4. Fourth Visit (16-19 weeks)

FVRCP Final
Rabies (1 year)

FVRCP (also known as feline distemper; 4 in 1)

F: Feline
V: Viral
R: Rhinotracheitis
P: Panleukopenia (feline distemper)

Leukemia:

Feline Leukemia is a form of cancer. This disease is caused by a virus that can lead to tumor growth nearly anywhere in the body as well as a variety of other symptoms. Infected cats are unable to resist other diseases and may die from associated infections. Feline Leukemia (FELV) can be transmitted several ways:

The saliva of an infected cat contaminating the eye, mouth or nasal membranes of a non-infected cat.
Transmitting infected blood to non infected cats.
Transmitted from mother to fetuses (developing kittens) during pregnancy.
Because feline leukemia is transmitted from contact with an infected cat, indoor adults cats do not need to be vaccinated for this disease. The recommendation from the American Association of Feline Practitioners, (AAFP) is for kittens however to receive at minimum two Leukemia vaccines during the first year of life. This is because kittens are higher risk of getting outside during their first year of life and therefore are more at risk to contact Leukemia infected cat. Additionally because the kitten’s immune system is still developing they are at higher risk of contracting the disease than an older cat if they are minimally exposed. Feline Leukemia Is a serious chronic disease with no cure. We want to protect all kittens from spread of this disease.

Panleukopenia:

The term Panleukopenia means a decrease in the number of all of the white blood cells in the body. White blood cells play a major role in immunity and are important in defending against infections and diseases. In severe Panleukopenia, white blood cell numbers may drop from the normal of several thousand per milliliter of blood to just a few hundred. This makes an infected cat extremely vulnerable to other infections.

Feline Panleukopenia [FPL] is caused by a virus of the Parvovirus family, Feline Panleukopenia Virus [FPLV]. A similar but distinct virus causes Parvovirus disease in dogs. Parvoviruses are among the toughest viruses known and are only killed by strong disinfectants including 2% household bleach. FPLV can survive in some environments for weeks or months.

The virus is shed in all excretions, particularly feces, of infected cats. It can be ingested directly or transferred to a susceptible cat via contaminated water, feed, bowls, or on shoes and clothing. The incubation period from infection until clinical signs develop is typically three to five days, seldom longer than a week.

Symptoms:
Lethargy
Vomiting
Diarrhea [may contain blood]
Hair coat becomes dull & rough
Dehydration
Discharge from eyes & nose
Rabies:

Protects against rabies virus, a fatal disease in animals and humans. The most common wildlife to spread rabies in Southern California is “BATS” and “OPOSSUMS.” It should be noted in particular that bats are able to gain access to indoor areas and potentially infect pets and people. Rabies affects the nervous system of bats and can cause abnormal behavior such as flying in the daytime and flying into homes. Because rabies is lethal to animals and humans, we recommend vaccinating even indoor cats.